Theatre arts – Theatre UAF http://theatreuaf.org/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:49:00 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://theatreuaf.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-18-120x120.png Theatre arts – Theatre UAF http://theatreuaf.org/ 32 32 Blinn College-Brenham Theater Arts Program Opens 2022-23 Season With “Houdini” October 6-9 | Texas https://theatreuaf.org/blinn-college-brenham-theater-arts-program-opens-2022-23-season-with-houdini-october-6-9-texas/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:49:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/blinn-college-brenham-theater-arts-program-opens-2022-23-season-with-houdini-october-6-9-texas/ The incredible story of one of the world’s greatest magicians will kick off the 2022-2023 productions of the Blinn College-Brenham Campus Theater Arts Program. “Houdini” will be presented at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, October 6 and 7, and Saturday and Sunday, October 8 and 9 at the Dr. WW O’Donnell Performing Arts Center. […]]]>

The incredible story of one of the world’s greatest magicians will kick off the 2022-2023 productions of the Blinn College-Brenham Campus Theater Arts Program.

“Houdini” will be presented at 7 p.m. on Thursday and Friday, October 6 and 7, and Saturday and Sunday, October 8 and 9 at the Dr. WW O’Donnell Performing Arts Center.

“This play – part biography and part fantasy – offers a spectacular look into the life of world-renowned escape artist Harry Houdini,” said drama teacher Brad Nies, who is directing the production. “I think this piece will appeal to young audiences, Houdini enthusiasts and ‘escape artists’ everywhere.”

“Houdini” is in keeping with “Magic in the Air,” the theme of this year’s four plays that will be staged, Nies added.

The other productions are:

“Christmas Eve”, 7 p.m. on December 1 and 2 and 2 p.m. on December 3 and 4;{

“Vinaigre Tom,” 7 p.m. Feb. 16 and 17 and 2 p.m. Feb. 18 and 19;

and “Ladies at the Alamo,” 7 p.m. April 27 and 28 and 2 p.m. April 29 and 30.

In addition to the plays, the program’s improv troupe “Slaphappy” will perform Oct. 13 and April 4, both at 7 p.m. at the O’Donnell Center.

Tickets are $5 and are available at www.blinn.edu/boxoffice.

Garrison Rutledge has the title role, with Lilly Marrs as his wife Beatrice. Other cast members are Josiah Fernandez, Marco Bone; Y’Lila Willis, Volonty; Christopher Westerlund as Grattan, the manager, Conan Doyle, judge #3 and medical student #1; Steve Torres as Bill the Tall Man, the prisoner, medical student #2 and judge #1; Maygen Meadows as Ariana, the doctor, Lady Doyle, judge #2 and medical student #2; Jayden Peavy as Pentecost; and Aiden McAllister as Epictetus.

The team members are Alyssa Hale, director and playwright; Samantha Nolen, assistant stage manager and playwright; Bianca O’Neal, understudy; Luke Parker, Master of Properties; Alexandria Cuellar, light panel operator; Jaylon Kelley, sound card operator; Cédric Bernard, projection operator; and Benedite Trecy, front desk manager. {

This will be the first starring role for Rutledge, a Bellville sophomore. Rutledge was memorable as the Hairy Man in last season’s production of “Wiley and the Hairy Man.”

“It’s exciting to show parts of me that I’ve never really shown on stage before,” he said. “Last year I was just doing a cartoon as Hairy Man. This year there’s so much emotion and motivation in everything Houdini does. It’s so interesting to try to stage this what his life was like as accurately as possible.

Rutledge, who has researched Houdini’s life extensively, said he believed the magician was motivated by a desire to impress his father, a Jewish rabbi.

“I don’t think Houdini was as mysterious as most people make him out to be. He was a very simple man who wanted to show himself to the world,” he said. “He was a showman. His father didn’t want him to be a magician. After his father died, I think Houdini’s goal was to impress everyone so he could impress his father. It’s just a great story to watch. Fame gnaws at him and he loses his relationships with most of his relatives.

Nies said this year’s theme was chosen with a view to refilling the O’Donnell Center.

“The kids put their hearts and souls into it,” he said. “It’s exciting to watch them grow and see them come out of this (pandemic) situation. The students we have now are the ones who lost their last years (high school) because of the pandemic. They are hungry for performance. They are chomping at the bit, I hope as much as our audience will be.

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Money, outdoor music, dance prizes, Grindr, theater https://theatreuaf.org/money-outdoor-music-dance-prizes-grindr-theater/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 08:20:15 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/money-outdoor-music-dance-prizes-grindr-theater/ Earlier this month, the Cape Cod Arts Foundation distributed record funding of $139,000 to help 14 local nonprofit arts organizations recover from the pandemic. The support was made possible through a grant the foundation received last year from the National Endowment for the Arts. “Temporary closures, the costs of implementing health and safety protocols, capacity […]]]>

Earlier this month, the Cape Cod Arts Foundation distributed record funding of $139,000 to help 14 local nonprofit arts organizations recover from the pandemic. The support was made possible through a grant the foundation received last year from the National Endowment for the Arts.

“Temporary closures, the costs of implementing health and safety protocols, capacity limits and continued public uncertainty about a return to in-person events have strained our creative industry,” said Julie. Wake, the foundation’s executive director, in an announcement of the grants. “These grants are a step towards recovery and ensure that arts and culture remains a vital part of Cape Town’s identity.”

Julie Wake, Executive Director of the Cape Cod Arts Foundation

The need for help, Wake said, was exemplified by the fact that the foundation received 26 requests, with groups seeking just under $390,000 in assistance. Grants obtained ranged from $5,000 to $20,000. The funds will be used for salaries, health and safety supplies, marketing and facilities costs, according to the announcement.

The Cape Cod Theater Co. in West Harwich, for example, needs to allocate its $20,000 staff grant to increase programming and diversify its courses. Song Keepers, which focuses its artistic and educational experiences for black and brown artists, will use its $10,000 grant to resume mentorship programs.

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JFK’s love for the arts shines in new Kennedy Center exhibit https://theatreuaf.org/jfks-love-for-the-arts-shines-in-new-kennedy-center-exhibit/ Tue, 20 Sep 2022 16:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/jfks-love-for-the-arts-shines-in-new-kennedy-center-exhibit/ John F. Kennedy is an outsized presence at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: the bronze bust of Robert Berks in the Grand Foyer, the larger-than-life statue unveiled on the Reach campus last winter, the letter quotes and of speeches carved into the marble facade of the building. But, according to Kennedy Center officials, […]]]>

John F. Kennedy is an outsized presence at the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts: the bronze bust of Robert Berks in the Grand Foyer, the larger-than-life statue unveiled on the Reach campus last winter, the letter quotes and of speeches carved into the marble facade of the building. But, according to Kennedy Center officials, they are still getting questions from visitors about the name of the Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts.

That shouldn’t be a problem after the public debut last week of “Art and Ideals,” a permanent exhibit on the Kennedy Center’s second floor showcasing John and Jacqueline Kennedy’s embrace of the arts, from the 1961 inauguration to the cultural diplomacy to the creation of the National Cultural Center, which was proposed under the Eisenhower administration but eventually became Washington’s “living memorial” to the 35th president.

It’s hard to believe that this 7,500 square foot room – filled with videos, illuminated display cases, walls of posters and artifacts, and crowned by a vibrant wraparound LED screen dubbed “the frieze” – was once the atrium gallery, event space for rent and occasional performance venue.

How a visitor enters the exhibit will shape their first impression: the vestibule closest to the Salle des Etats contains a cursory biography of the former president – ​​his large family, PT-109, his marriage to Jacqueline Bouvier. The crates contain books Kennedy read as a child, including “Billy Whiskers’ Friends” and “Black Beauty,” as well as foreign-language translations of Pulitzer Prize-winning “Profiles in Courage.” The vestibule on the side of the Hall of Nations offers an introduction to the Kennedy Center itself, with a video of Jacqueline Kennedy standing next to a model of the Kennedy Center talking about a vision for its programming, intercut with clips of ” Tosca” and beatboxers and memorabilia from the centre’s opening.

A section on “dance diplomacy” shows how the Kennedy Center hosts cultural events in the community and online, a continuation of the policies that sent the New York City Ballet to perform behind the Iron Curtain, or the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater in Southeast Asia; another exhibit focuses on how the Kennedys used the White House as a showcase for the best of American art, inviting the National Symphony Orchestra and the American Shakespeare Festival Theater to perform at official state dinners.

The exhibits make judicious use of vintage video clips and for the most part the sound is isolated from the immediate area – you can see a screen with footage of the March on Washington across the room, but this is not is only when you are almost inside. ahead, you hear actor James Baldwin discuss civil rights. Certain noises permeate the space – a “Kennedy!” campaign jingle or sound bites from the famous 1962 “We Chose to Go to the Moon” speech – and you think of wandering across the room to see which display it came from.

Every hour or so, the lights go out, the other videos go silent, and Kennedy’s distinctive accent echoes through the space. A black-and-white video of the president appears above every wall, assuring an audience, and us, that “after the dust of centuries has passed over our cities, we too will not be remembered. for victories or defeats in battle or politics, but for our contribution to the human spirit. The speech, from a 1962 fundraiser for the National Cultural Center dubbed “An American Pageant of the Arts,” is accompanied by clips of Harry Belafonte singing “Michael Row the Boat Ashore” and a Yo-Yo Ma from 7 years dazzling. on the cello, and stills of Fred Astaire and Lorraine Hansberry as Kennedy speaks.

A few minutes later, the lights come back on and people continue to browse the individual screens. There are three of these “takeovers”: one shows highlights of Kennedy’s inauguration, and another features his famous “moonstroke” address at Rice University, accompanied by dramatic images of the lunar surface. In between, wraparound screens show the opera’s crystal chandelier, historic photos of events like the March on Washington, and famous quotes from Kennedy. But it’s the dinner presentation for the National Cultural Center — now, of course, known as the Kennedy Center — that hammers home the message: the arts are essential to the American way of life.

If visitors spend longer than expected, it will be because of the exhibition’s interactive elements, which are, of course, social media friendly. A section of mirrored wall contains a word cloud with “poetry”, “freedom”, “achievement” and “politics” among floating hologram-like choices. As you get closer to the screen, the words fly and turn into a quote from Kennedy, such as “Art and the encouragement of art is political in the deepest sense” or ” When power corrupts, poetry cleans.” (The mirrored backdrop calls for selfies.)

An interactive “dinner table” recalls the Kennedy White House dinners with prominent writers, dancers and thinkers, and asks visitors to consider who they would like to dine with: Amy Tan? Francois Collins? Tennessee Williams? Choose a category, such as “musicians,” and you’ll have a choice between the actual Kennedy dinner guests, like Aaron Copland or Isaac Stern, or more contemporary options, like Dolly Parton, Yo-Yo Ma, and, uh, recent White House visitor Olivia Rodrigo. Select a guest to read inspirational quotes from each topic. “If you don’t like the road you’re on, start paving another one,” Parton advises.

I’m willing to bet the most popular attraction will be a touchscreen kiosk that lets visitors create a self-portrait in the style of Elaine de Kooning, who captured Kennedy in a series of portraits in the 1960s. Choose a color palette, doodle a few abstract lines in the background, then pose for a photo. The “painting” appears before your eyes with a wash of brushstrokes or charcoal, resembling the most artistic smartphone filter ever. A QR code allows you to download the image and, inevitably, post it on social media, because you’re going to want to show it off.

Opening the exhibit, Kennedy’s granddaughter, Rose Kennedy Schlossberg, pointed out that while the venue’s name honors the late president, “there has never been a place at the Kennedy Center for know more about him so far”. For baby boomers who remember where they were on November 22, 1963, and Gen Z viewers for whom John F. Kennedy was a name in the AP history class, this new field is an opportunity to learn why the Washington Post once called Kennedy “culture’s best friend in the White House since Thomas Jefferson,” and how he used the nation’s highest office to shape a national conversation around the arts. worth arriving half an hour or an hour before the next ONS or Millennium Stage performance to explore the space or, for fans of presidential history, a visit in its own right.

“Arts and Ideals: President John F. Kennedy” can be found on the roof terrace level of the Kennedy Center, 2700 F St. NW. kennedy-center.org. Open daily from noon to midnight. Free.

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Award-winning performing arts school celebrates 10 years in the heart of the Teddington community | Local News | New https://theatreuaf.org/award-winning-performing-arts-school-celebrates-10-years-in-the-heart-of-the-teddington-community-local-news-new/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 16:00:02 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/award-winning-performing-arts-school-celebrates-10-years-in-the-heart-of-the-teddington-community-local-news-new/ A performing arts school in the heart of the Teddington community reached a momentous milestone in September, celebrating its 10th anniversary. Teddington Dance Studio (TDS) opened on Church Road in September 2012 and has nurtured a love of the performing arts ever since. Students ages three through adults are welcome and encouraged to learn and […]]]>

A performing arts school in the heart of the Teddington community reached a momentous milestone in September, celebrating its 10th anniversary.

Teddington Dance Studio (TDS) opened on Church Road in September 2012 and has nurtured a love of the performing arts ever since.

Students ages three through adults are welcome and encouraged to learn and develop their dance and performance technique in a fun and friendly environment.

TDS offers a wide range of classes including melodic movement, musical theatre, acrobatics, commercial jazz and tap dancing for adults, while also teaching ballet, tap dancing and modern all year round, where students can work for grade exams.

Natalie Randhawa is Principal at TDS and has guided the school through its 10 year journey.

Growing up in Teddington, her love of dancing began at the age of three, where she immediately joined performing arts school, rising through the ranks before competing professionally overseas.

After becoming a teacher, Natalie soon realized that she wanted to channel her passion for the arts by creating her own school where she could accompany students on their journey and create an environment where dance enthusiasts could come together and perform.

For a school that started with eight students, TDS now has over 200 students.

2022 is a testament to how far the performing arts school has come, with TDS shining in this year’s All England National Final, where the under-11 classical ballet trio won a bronze medal well deserved, competing with 16 other schools in the process. .

TDS’ modern under-11 group also performed well, as did 7-year-old student Lilly in her stunning ballet solo.

Although neither won medals at the national championships, the two TDS participants battled competition from 24 other schools in their regional qualifiers to rightfully ensure they were part of the prestigious competition. by All England Dance.

And from the stage to the big screen, two of the school’s talented dancers will also feature in upcoming Netflix productions coming out later this year.

The 12-year-old duo, Nancy Kerr-Elliott and Teigan Lea-Fagan, have been dating TDS since they were three years old and will star in upcoming Netflix productions.

Reflecting on the whirlwind of a year, Natalie told Nub News: “It’s been the busiest year so far, without a doubt! Coming back from the pandemic, we were sort of catching up with all things we weren’t able to do on zoom such as our big costume show.

“The kids have really enjoyed being back in an environment where they can share their love of dance and I couldn’t be more proud of what the whole team has achieved together in 2022, I think some people have actually forgot how busy we are when we’re operating a full schedule!”

To mark a decade of TDS, the school, in and around regular classes and exam preparation, is preparing for its anniversary show in March 2023. An opportunity for students, parents and teachers to come together and celebrate what has been accomplished so far.

Reflecting on 10 years of TDS, Nub News asked Natalie if there was one memory that stuck particularly close to home.

The TDS director added, “If I had to choose one, which is incredibly difficult, I would have to say the first costume show we’ve ever done.

“Just over 40 children took part which was incredibly exciting as it was the first time we could really show parents what school is all about and how memorable a collective performance can be.

“Our costume shows held every two years are now arguably the biggest date on the calendar and it really is the perfect representation of who we are.”

Proud parents watch the TDS girls take part in the school’s famous costume show.

As TDS prepares to enter its second decade, when asked what the future holds for the School of Performing Arts, Natalie simply replies, “Look at this space.”

After the school’s remarkable success in its stellar first decade, we can’t wait!

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Worthys Jubilee Hall trustees speak out amid Winchester theater arts controversy https://theatreuaf.org/worthys-jubilee-hall-trustees-speak-out-amid-winchester-theater-arts-controversy/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/worthys-jubilee-hall-trustees-speak-out-amid-winchester-theater-arts-controversy/ THE TRUSTEES of Worthys Jubilee Hall have spoken out following their controversial decision to raise rental costs and cut hours at a long-established art school, forcing the family business to look elsewhere after more four decades in the establishment. Winchester Theater Arts has been teaching dance and musical theater to children in Kings Worthy for […]]]>

THE TRUSTEES of Worthys Jubilee Hall have spoken out following their controversial decision to raise rental costs and cut hours at a long-established art school, forcing the family business to look elsewhere after more four decades in the establishment.

Winchester Theater Arts has been teaching dance and musical theater to children in Kings Worthy for 45 years.

Based in the hall, the company started with just 15 students on a Saturday morning.

It is now home to 10 times that number, welcoming students as young as three years old and supervising them up to 19 years old.

During this time he helped “hundreds, if not thousands” of children to pursue their passion, some of whom went on to perform in the West End.

However, the school’s headmistress, Claire Goodwin, recently revealed that her hours had been cut by school administrators at a time when she was looking to expand.

Registered with the Charities Commission, the trustees told him they felt the room should instead be made available for later ‘community use’.

This, combined with the directors’ decision to raise rental costs for the second time this year, has forced her to scale back current operations and consider moving the much-loved organization to new pastures.

Although Ms Goodwin admitted she would be sad to leave the venue, she insisted it could be an “exciting” time for anyone involved with Winchester Theater Arts.

However, friends and former students of the school criticized the decision. They say administrators will struggle to replace the much-loved company once it’s gone.

READ MORE: Community center reopens at Hampshire Otterbourne Hill care home after pandemic shutdown

In a joint statement, the trustees said: “The Worthys Jubilee Hall has been a well-used and valued community asset for over 80 years. The trustees’ aim is to increase the use of the hall by a wider variety of community and commercial organizations and individuals, and to mitigate the risk to venue revenue by relying on very few organizations.

“To work towards this goal, the administrators have determined a cap for all regular bookings at ‘rush hour’ to allow regular users to only bulk book after 7 p.m. on both weeknights and until 1 p.m. on weekends, making room for new volunteers or business organizations to grow and prosper, and for local residents to book events such as children’s parties.

“Prior to the new policy, Winchester Theater Arts used Jubilee Hall during school terms for more than 27 hours a week. The new policy would have resulted in them either reducing their bookings by 4 ¾ hours or moving those hours outside of the room. premium time slots.

“Instead, Winchester Theater Arts has decided to drastically reduce its bookings to 10 ¾ hours per week. All town halls, as well as residents, are experiencing steep increases in utility bills and as a result, a slight increase has been applied to our hiring fee for commercial users of the room.

“This is now in line with other local halls and ensures that required maintenance tasks can be carried out to keep the hall in operation. As a charity, The Worthys Jubilee Hall is not in a position to subsidize commercial organisations.

“The Worthys Jubilee Hall has maintained reduced hiring fees for community, charity and volunteerism. Trustees look forward to December theater productions to be held at the hall, including the annual Worthy Players pantomime on Friday 2 , Saturday 3, Friday 9 and Saturday 10 December, and Winchester Theater Arts Musical Christmas from Friday 16 to Sunday 18 December.

Having just finished their annual show – which saw more than 130 children perform over three days – Ms Goodwin said no move was imminent and the school would continue to use both the venue and its studio for the moment.

For more information about the school, including hiring policy, visit: jubileehall.org.uk

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Residents react with sadness as Winchester Theater Arts looks set to leave The Worthys Jubilee Hall https://theatreuaf.org/residents-react-with-sadness-as-winchester-theater-arts-looks-set-to-leave-the-worthys-jubilee-hall/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/residents-react-with-sadness-as-winchester-theater-arts-looks-set-to-leave-the-worthys-jubilee-hall/ Residents reacted with sadness to the news that a long-established art school is looking for a new home after spending more than four decades in the same village hall. Winchester Theater Arts has been teaching dance and musical theater to children in Kings Worthy for 45 years. Based in Jubilee Hall, the family business started […]]]>

Residents reacted with sadness to the news that a long-established art school is looking for a new home after spending more than four decades in the same village hall.

Winchester Theater Arts has been teaching dance and musical theater to children in Kings Worthy for 45 years.

Based in Jubilee Hall, the family business started with just 15 students on a Saturday morning.

It is now home to 10 times that number, welcoming students as young as three years old and supervising them up to 19 years old.

However, as noted earlier by the Cchronic, School principal Claire Goodwin said her hours had recently been reduced by school administrators.

Registered with the Charities Commission, the trustees told him they felt the room should instead be made available for later ‘community use’.

This, coupled with rising rental costs, forced her to consider moving the much-loved organization to new pastures.

Steeped in history, Ms Goodwin said while this could prove to be an exciting step in the school’s journey, it will be an equally emotional moment when the curtain falls on her time in the hall.

However, the decision has drawn anger from parents and former students who say Ms Goodwin was treated “unfairly”.

Robina Hatchett has known Ms Goodwin since she started the group in 1977. Her daughter and granddaughter are currently students.

READ MORE: Winchester music festival Mucky Weekender prepares to kick off the weekend at Vicarage Farm

She said: “Thousands of children have passed through the school and now Claire is welcoming the third generation of local children. Claire, Laura and their whole team have worked hard over these years, improving conditions at the inside and outside the room, even paying for new chairs for the enjoyment of all users, replacing older and less comfortable seats.

“It is therefore devastating for everyone linked to the group to learn that the new rental conditions from next month will prevent them from continuing to train in their current location.

“Why haven’t the administrators recognized the importance of allowing the school to continue to use the premises? The venue will lose a significant amount of money per month when the drama school is no longer there – d will all the new tenants come from to make up for this shortfall?

“What will happen to this amazing local dance and theater school if they can’t find alternative venues to hold their classes? And what will happen to the venue if they can’t find alternative venues? ‘other tenants in the future?’

Sarah Cronin and her sister were students at Winchester Theater Arts for 15 years. Now her daughter, 4, and her niece, 5, are both taking lessons. She says Ms Goodwin was disappointed with the ‘politics’ among the directors.

She said: ‘The school does so much for the village and various local causes – they have raised £2,500 for Ukraine this year.’

She added: “It’s an inclusive school which really helps to build the confidence of young people; it helped me a lot with my shyness as a child. There’s no pressure to look or be in a way and in today’s social media-influenced world, it’s so refreshing for kids to be able to go somewhere where they’re not judged by their peers.”

Having just finished their annual show – which saw more than 130 children perform over three days – Ms Goodwin said no move was imminent and the school would continue to use both the venue and its studio for the moment.

Room administrators have been contacted for comment.

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BLINN THEATER ARTS-BRENHAM RELEASE CALENDAR 2022-2023 https://theatreuaf.org/blinn-theater-arts-brenham-release-calendar-2022-2023/ Fri, 09 Sep 2022 15:03:59 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/blinn-theater-arts-brenham-release-calendar-2022-2023/ The Blinn College-Brenham Campus Theater Arts Program promises a little something for everyone in their performances for the 2022-2023 school year. The season begins with “Houdini,” which runs from October 6-9. This will be followed by “The Day Before Christmas” from December 1-4. After winter break, “Vinegar Tom” will be played February 16-19 and “Ladies […]]]>

The Blinn College-Brenham Campus Theater Arts Program promises a little something for everyone in their performances for the 2022-2023 school year.

The season begins with “Houdini,” which runs from October 6-9. This will be followed by “The Day Before Christmas” from December 1-4.

After winter break, “Vinegar Tom” will be played February 16-19 and “Ladies at the Alamo” April 27-30.

All performances take place at the Dr. WW O’Donnell Performing Arts Center. Thursday and Friday evening performances begin at 7 p.m., while Saturday and Sunday performances will be at 2 p.m.

“Houdini” is described as a biography and a fantastic look into the life of world famous magician Harry Houdini. It is also Blinn’s entrance to the Kennedy Center American College Play Festival.

“The Day Before Christmas” is the showcase for Blinn’s Faculty of Theater Arts. It’s about Jack Frost causing winter mayhem for Santa on the biggest night of the year. Blinn Theater Arts teacher Brad Nies will play the role of Jack Frost, while technical theater teacher Kevin Patrick will play Santa Claus.

“Vinegar Tom” is a historical tragedy set during the witch hunts of modern Europe. It’s about a woman who is called a witch by a man she romantically rejected. This will also be Blinn’s entry into the Texas Community College Speech and Theater Arts Play Festival.

“Ladies at the Alamo” is about an artistic director of a regional theater in Texas City, who is challenged by her board of directors. Nies described it as part of “Steel Magnolias” and “Designing Women”.

Ticket information for each performance is available at www.blinn.edu/boxoffice.

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Vanguard University’s Department of Theater Arts Presents Award-Winning Fantasy PETER AND THE STARCATCHER https://theatreuaf.org/vanguard-universitys-department-of-theater-arts-presents-award-winning-fantasy-peter-and-the-starcatcher/ Tue, 06 Sep 2022 22:40:39 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/vanguard-universitys-department-of-theater-arts-presents-award-winning-fantasy-peter-and-the-starcatcher/ Vanguard University’s highly acclaimed and award-winning Department of Theater Arts presents Peter and the Starcatcher, written by rick elicemusic by wayne barker and an adaptation of the novel written by david barry and Ridley Pearson. The production runs at the Lyceum Theater on the campus of Vanguard University, beginning September 16, 2022 and running for […]]]>

Vanguard University’s highly acclaimed and award-winning Department of Theater Arts presents Peter and the Starcatcher, written by rick elicemusic by wayne barker and an adaptation of the novel written by david barry and Ridley Pearson.

The production runs at the Lyceum Theater on the campus of Vanguard University, beginning September 16, 2022 and running for three weekends through October 2.

“It was a pleasure to get to work on this fun and whimsical show with such an incredibly talented group of students who are beyond professional level. Through this piece, we hope to give the audience a chance to stretch their imaginations and to remember the importance of finding the magic within us!” -Caitlin Harjes

Caitlin Harjes is a professional teaching artist working throughout Orange County. She has directed, choreographed and musically directed young people from 5 years old to high school. For 3 years she was part of the Disney Musicals in Schools program through the Segerstrom Center for the Performing Arts as a teaching artist. Caitlin has also worked at schools and conservatories in Orange County including the Orange County Children’s Theater, Arts and Learning Conservatory, Marina High School, and the Irvine School District. In 2021, she served as Director of Education for American Coast Children’s Theater and has been Director of Theater here at Vanguard University for the past year.

Peter and the Starcatcher synopsis: Based on the novel by david barry and Ridley Pearson, the prequel story to the beloved Peter Pan! A Tony award-winning play, based on the best-selling novels, turns the century-old story of how a wretched orphan becomes the legendary Peter Pan upside down! From marauding pirates and tyrants of the jungle to unwitting comrades and unlikely heroes, Peter and the Starcatcher playfully explores the depths of greed and despair…and the bonds of friendship, duty and love . Peter and the Starcatcher uses unlimited possibilities of imagination to bring the story to life.

This production is suitable for children aged 6 and over.

All shows are performed on the Vanguard University campus at the Lyceum Theater. Ticket prices are $17 for general admission and $15 for seniors, children, students and groups. Tickets can be purchased at www.vanguardtickets.com or by calling the Theater Department box office at 714-668-6145.

The dates and times of the performances are

September 16, 17, 23, 24, 30 and October 1 at 7:30 p.m.;

September 17, 18, 24, 25, October 1 and 2 at 2 p.m.

For more information on Vanguard University and the Theater Department, visit www.vanguard.edu.

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Marblehead Ballet’s 51st Season Workshops Will Include Theater Arts, Polish Folk Dance and More https://theatreuaf.org/marblehead-ballets-51st-season-workshops-will-include-theater-arts-polish-folk-dance-and-more/ Sat, 03 Sep 2022 22:16:07 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/marblehead-ballets-51st-season-workshops-will-include-theater-arts-polish-folk-dance-and-more/ The Marblehead School of Ballet (MSB) will be celebrating its 51st season with workshops and special classes designed to meet the interests of children, teens and adults of all abilities. A range of classes, workshops and events from ballet to ballroom dancing are planned for the 2022-2023 year in studio and live online. The studio […]]]>

The Marblehead School of Ballet (MSB) will be celebrating its 51st season with workshops and special classes designed to meet the interests of children, teens and adults of all abilities. A range of classes, workshops and events from ballet to ballroom dancing are planned for the 2022-2023 year in studio and live online. The studio is located at 115 Pleasant Street in scenic Marblehead, Massachusetts.

“Our 51st season places us in the great tradition of ballet. It is a traditional art form passed down from generation to generation: from teacher to student, from older generation to the younger generation,” said Paula K. Shiff, director of Marblehead. Ballet school. “Over time, the student becomes the teacher and the art form continues. Every person who has passed through our studio has helped maintain our tradition. The Marblehead School of Ballet thanks you all and we look forward to the coming.”

51st Season Special Workshop Series

To celebrate the 51st season, four special workshops will be presented. The first workshop features the Monthly Dance Adventure, covering four short Sevillanas dances by popular Sevillanas Corraleras from Seville, Spain. Sevillanas are the earliest form of dance, enjoyed solo, in duos or in groups. They are danced at celebrations, festivals and parties!

The workshop meets monthly on Sundays, September 11, October 8, November 13, and December 11 from 2:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. EST. Students of all levels, from 12 years old, are welcome. No previous dance experience is required. Carlos Fittante, principal dancer and co-choreographer of the Boston Early Music Festival and artistic director of BALAM Dance Theater in New York, teaches this enriching workshop.

The second highlights Broadway in the “Theater Arts Workshop,” a six-week series with Karen Mary Pisani, the former dance captain and National Touring Company performer of A Chorus Line under the direction of Michael Bennett. Learn what theater kids do in New York! This theater workshop for ages seven to ten will create a Broadway atmosphere, where all forms of dance, voice and acting are learned and practiced. The six-week series runs on Tuesdays from October 4 to November 9 from 4:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.

In the third featured series, Ivan Korn teaches Modern Dance Technique, a four-session modern dance workshop with an emphasis on learning a two-minute choreography. Students, ages 12 and up, will develop spatial awareness, an understanding of the fundamentals of music, rhythm and rhythm, and the phrasing of dance movement. The workshop takes place on Saturdays, from October 15 to November 12, from 11:30 p.m. to 1:00 p.m. No classes will take place on October 29.

Korn, a native of Santiago, Chile, earned a Masters of Fine Arts in Choreography at the Boston Conservatory and has performed in New England at the Boston Center for the Arts, Joyce SoHo in New York, and Jacob’s Pillow in Beckett, Massachusetts. .

In the final workshop, dancer Eddie Lempitski returns to school to give a Polish folk dance class on Saturday November 19 from 11:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Students will learn to dance the Polish dance, the Polonaise. Lempitski, an MSB graduate and former performer of the North Shore Civic Ballet, was a member of Boston’s Krakowiak Polish Dancers and performed throughout North America and Poland.

Registration for these workshops is done online at marbleheadschoolofballet.com/classes/schedule/. Workshops are delivered in-studio and live online. To enter, call 781-631-6262 or contact msb@havetodance.com.

New course season

Adopting a motto of quality education, MSB provides individual attention and works with people to achieve their goals. The school’s program offers classes to meet the needs of seasoned dancers, as well as amateur and up-and-coming dancers of all ages. Children, teens and adults find a range of opportunities available to suit their interests. The new season offers classes for all ages and levels in ballet, pointe, pre-pointe, variations, modern and creative movement, stretch and strength, ballroom, swing, Argentine tango, Latin solo work and tai chi . Students can enroll in courses full-time or on a continuing basis. Drop-ins are welcome. Check the schedule at bit.ly/MSBschedule.

Private and semi-private lessons are also available live online and in the studio for dancers of all ages and levels by appointment. Lessons are available for creating a fun dance at a couple’s wedding, preparing for a sports competition, developing skills for a dance performance, training for college auditions, training for a sport, working on alignment and coordination or seek further instructions. Private lesson information is available at bit.ly/2CtETn6.

Register

MSB operates year-round and offers open registration on a rolling basis. Although students are welcome to start at any time, prior registration is required. To register for a course or for more information, visit www.marbleheadschoolofballet.comcall 781-631-6262 or contact msb@havetodance.com.

About Marblehead Ballet School

Celebrating its 51st year, The Marblehead School of Ballet, founded in 1971 by Paula K. Shiff, has earned a wide reputation for excellence in training and integrity of purpose. Classical ballet forms the core of instruction with particular emphasis on correct alignment and the development of strength and agility. The pure enjoyment of dance and music is always at the heart of the classroom experience.

The graded basic program for children includes lessons in ballet technique with advanced work on repertoire and pointes. The school also offers a modern dance department, classes for young children in creative movement, and improvisation and technique classes for older students. A full range of adult courses is offered.

MSB is home to the North Shore Civic Ballet Company (NSCB). The NSCB gives concerts and a variety of educational programs for schools; all are suitable for different age groups and levels of development.

For more information, call 781-631-6262, email msb@havetodance.com or visit www.marbleheadschoolofballet.com.

Photo credit: Pierre A.Smith

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Richard ‘Rick’ Waites, founder of Olympic Theater Arts, has died https://theatreuaf.org/richard-rick-waites-founder-of-olympic-theater-arts-has-died/ Wed, 31 Aug 2022 08:30:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/richard-rick-waites-founder-of-olympic-theater-arts-has-died/ Known for his sense of humor, love of theater, family and the outdoors, Richard “Rick” Waites, founder of Olympic Theater Arts (OTA), died in August, officials confirmed last week family and theatre. Local theater flourished after its three performances of Samuel Beckett’s “Krapp’s Last Tape” in March 1980 at Dungeness Schoolhouse. Waites, who played with […]]]>

Known for his sense of humor, love of theater, family and the outdoors, Richard “Rick” Waites, founder of Olympic Theater Arts (OTA), died in August, officials confirmed last week family and theatre.

Local theater flourished after its three performances of Samuel Beckett’s “Krapp’s Last Tape” in March 1980 at Dungeness Schoolhouse.

Waites, who played with the Port Angeles Community Players, asked the public if he would be willing to start a Sequim band. A few were, and the theater community in Sequim grew.

His wife at the time, Wendy Waites, said they discussed how he could do more of his own theater in the area, and OTA started with a three-person team.

“It was really fun,” Wendy said. “We made lights out of coffee cans because that’s what you do on a budget.”

Waites helped/performed in a few other school plays, Wendy Waites said, and they held fundraisers before building a theater (then called Howard Wood Memorial Theater) in 1983 above Cole’s Jewelers , now Calvary Chapel Sequim.

“We’ve had so much support from the community and people established in the community,” she said.

Olivia Shea, one of the founding members, fondly remembers Waites and the early days of OTA.

“It was one of the most fun parts of my life,” she said. “Everything was so new and you could do anything (on stage).”

OTA grew again in 2003 following the efforts of Elaine and Bob Caldwell to rally support for the purchase of the former Boys & Girls Club at 414 N. Sequim Ave.

Within 10 years it was renovated and eventually became the Olympic Center for the Theater Arts, with plays, events and meetings all year round.

In an interview, Waites said he views OTA as an educational experience.

“His goal was to bring an alternative type of theater to the community, and where actors could stretch out,” said Wendy Waites.

Life

He and Wendy moved from Sequim to Edmonds in 1989 to raise their two children Ian and Jaclyn. Waites sought to connect with repertory theater in Seattle while working in marketing and sales.

“His real love was performing,” said Wendy Waites. “That’s where he was most comfortable.”

Waites, born and raised in Southern California, caught the acting bug while in college at Golden West College where “it just kicked in with him,” she said.

He had leading roles in “The Crucible” and “Black Comedy”, a play where light and dark are transposed.

“It was a fun piece for him and he talked about it a lot,” Wendy Waites said.

Waites graduated with the intention of becoming an actor and joined a troupe of actors traveling the area to re-enact the gunfights of the old west.

After college, he was drafted into the United States Army to fight in the Vietnam War in a special forces division of the Army’s 25th Infantry Division on reconnaissance. Wendy Waites said he would help rescue soldiers, recover items from downed planes and gather intelligence. He received many accolades for his service, including Bronze Star Medal, Purple Heart, and more. He was injured while on duty and completed his service in the United States in 1973.

Wendy Waites said he helped a friend move to Sequim in 1975, so he decided to stay here too.

Waites had many interests besides acting. He was a good musician and could play flute, harmonica and saxophone, Wendy Waites said.

He also loved baseball and briefly played in a San Diego farm league as a pitcher and center fielder. In his 50s, he played a year in the Senior League World Series in Arizona where he was nicknamed “Wheels” because he was so fast.

Waites had a great sense of humor, Wendy Waites said, as he took tumbles, ran into traffic, and always made people laugh.

“Even until the day before he died, he was joking, making others laugh,” she said.

“Both kids have his sense of humor, quick wits too.”

Waites returned to the Sequim area in 2009 and left a few years later to live in Kingston. He was born on July 24, 1947 and died on August 9, 2022.

In lieu of flowers, family members request that donations be made in her name to Olympic Theater Arts; see olympictheatrearts.org.

Olympic Theater Arts’ first unofficial play. Founder Rick Waites asked members of the public to join an acting group for the Sequim area.” loading=”lazy” srcset=”https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-scaled.jpg 1707w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-200×300.jpg 200w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-683×1024.jpg 683w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-1024×1536.jpg 1024w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-1365×2048.jpg 1365w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-200×300@2x.jpg 400w, https://2obtaz1watdk1gq96f1dhka8-wpengine.netdna-ssl.com/wp-content/uploads/2022/08/30160137_web1_WaitesPasses-SEQ-220831-full_2-683×1024@2x.jpg 1366w” sizes=”(max-width: 1707px) 100vw, 1707px”/>

Poster by Roger Thias/ The original poster for ‘Krapp’s Last Tape’ served as the introduction to what was to become Olympic Theater Arts’ first unofficial play. Founder Rick Waites asked members of the public to join an acting group for the Sequim area.

Photo submitted Rick Waites, left, stars as Scrooge with Chris Reinertsen as the ghost of Marley in a 1986 production of

Photo submitted Rick Waites, left, stars as Scrooge with Chris Reinertsen as the ghost of Marley in a 1986 production of ‘A Christmas Carol’ for Olympic Theater Arts. Waites founded OTA, which for many years performed upstairs at the current Calvary Chapel Sequim building in downtown Sequim.

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