Theatre arts – Theatre UAF http://theatreuaf.org/ Wed, 24 Nov 2021 21:34:31 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://theatreuaf.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/10/icon-18-120x120.png Theatre arts – Theatre UAF http://theatreuaf.org/ 32 32 Suspenseful ‘Night Watch’ at the Newport Theater Arts Center https://theatreuaf.org/suspenseful-night-watch-at-the-newport-theater-arts-center/ Tue, 23 Nov 2021 20:19:06 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/suspenseful-night-watch-at-the-newport-theater-arts-center/ Randy Calcetas and Vince Campbell in “Night Watch” By Eric Marchese | NB Indy Special Ask theater fans to identify Lucille Fletcher and they’ll tell you that she wrote “Sorry, Wrong Number,” which won her success and fame as a radio play in 1943. Five years later, Fletcher l ‘turned into a novel and also […]]]>
Randy Calcetas and Vince Campbell in “Night Watch”

By Eric Marchese | NB Indy Special

Ask theater fans to identify Lucille Fletcher and they’ll tell you that she wrote “Sorry, Wrong Number,” which won her success and fame as a radio play in 1943. Five years later, Fletcher l ‘turned into a novel and also developed it for the big screen.

During the 1940s Fletcher specialized in radio plays and, mainly from the 1950s, in novels. In 1952, Fletcher adapted “Wrong Number” for the stage, as well as his hit 1941 radio thriller “The Hitch-Hiker”. The two-act thriller “Night Watch” is her only other play, and it alone is the only work she has written specifically for the stage.

Well directed by veteran director Sharyn Case, the Newport Theater Arts Center’s new production gives theater fans a chance to see the rarely produced script of 1972 and appreciate Fletcher’s talents even more.

Like “Wrong Number,” the story portrays a woman who stands alone trying to convince others of an impending deadly threat – and who is wrung out, her emotions soaring.

Elaine Wheeler (Holly Jones) and her husband John (Vince Campbell), a successful Wall Street broker, enjoy the wealth and comfort in their posh townhouse in midtown Manhattan.

But appearances can be deceiving. Elaine struggles with chronic insomnia born out of her life in Beverly Hills with her first husband.

The splendor of their lives is shattered by her gruesome death in a car accident, which triggers a nervous breakdown in Elaine. Moving to New York and remarrying only vaguely hides the effects of this trauma.

Arousing her edgy nerves is a new shock: during a raging thunderstorm, Elaine peeks out of a window at the back of the house. Looking across the yard, she sees a man being murdered.

Elaine and John summon the police, who discover no evidence of violence, let alone a corpse.

“Night Watch” then follows Elaine’s attempts to find out what she witnessed and urge others to take action. A day later, she sees another corpse – yet, given her fragile emotional state, no one takes her seriously.

Suspenseful audiences will detect elements from Hitchcock films such as “Rear Window” and “Dial M for Murder” – and, even more importantly, the 1938 play “Gaslight”, so popular it has. been shot twice in the 1940s.

Taylor James Bannert, Holly Jones, Andrew Margolin in “Night Watch”

Like Elaine, the NTAC audience is faced with a multitude of puzzling events and circumstances to sort through. Is Elaine suffering from another depression or has she actually witnessed two murders? We’re just as unbalanced as Elaine is, and Case and her expert cast fit the bill in a pleasantly fluid and engaging production.

If Elaine is indeed “gas-lit,” Fletcher gives us plenty of suspects. At the top of the list is John, so overprotective that he isolates him. More than domineering, Campbell is thick-skinned, bossy and critical, his John is clearly a cold fish. Sarah Hoeven is just as sketchy as Blanche, Elaine’s best friend, whose job as a nurse positions her to closely monitor Elaine’s physical and mental state.

Hoeven approaches but never crosses Blanche’s line condescending Elaine and joking her guesses. She and Campbell make us suspect the worst betrayal while wondering what would motivate them to stir up the poor woman’s paranoia.

Longtime faithful servant Helga (Beverly Crain), prominent psychiatrist and insomnia specialist Dr. Tracey Lake (Trungta Kae Werner), and the excitable Sam Hoke (Taylor James Bannert), who runs a business in proximity, are also part of the mix.

Eccentric neighbor Curtis Appleby (Randy Calcetas, in a windy bend) postulates that Elaine is the target of a macabre prank, delivering the line of choice “Murder is my hobby”.

Investigative Detective Lt. Walker (Andrew Margolin) clearly sees Elaine as crazy, spending more time pleasing her and refuting her claims than serious digging. She insists that she is “not one of those crazy ladies who see things”, but when it comes to Walker, she is only “causing trouble”.

Margolin and, in a dual role, Bannert, provide just enough humor, delivered with a pungent New Yorker, to ease the tense stream of bloodshed and chaos that riddles the dark underbelly of the Wheelers’ seemingly charmed life.

As the focal point of the story, Jones holds our attention throughout. The script gradually reveals Elaine’s traumatic past, with events unfolding like a nightmare. While clearly on the edge, riddled with doubts, unable to trust her sanity, Jones wisely walks away from making Elaine flighty or shrill, portraying her as a generally sane person, bewildered by disturbing events.

Everyone in all of Case does a terrific job playing very close to the vest. None of them seem to us to be frankly guilty of having pushed Elaine to the brink of reason or, on the contrary, free from all suspicion.

They keep the guessing game going until the last moments, which provides a plausible explanation while throwing a curve that few could predict.

The folks at “The Cliff Drive Playhouse” bolster the script with top notch production values, just like every NTAC production.

Jim Huffman’s set design serves a home full of tasteful elegance and comfort, accented by Leslye Wanthal’s Picasso, Matisse and Modigliani works that guests are sure to be priceless originals, not copies. Pretty costumes by Tom Phillips and Larry Watts add to the visual splendor, and lighting by Josh Serrano and sound design by Brian Page put the finishing touches on this well-crafted staging.

Unless you’ve already seen “Night Watch” on stage or caught the 1973 film version (starring Laurence Harvey and Elizabeth Taylor as the Wheelers), you’ll be hard pressed to solve this puzzle – so come on. Newport Beach and indulge yourself in a holiday spectacle that offers a welcome change of pace from the current crop of Christmas food.

Newport Theater Arts Center, 2501 Cliff Drive, Newport Beach. Until December 12. Duration: 2 hours 20 minutes (including intermission). Tickets: $ 20. Ticket purchase / information: (949) 631-0288, www.ntaconline.com.

Eric Marchese has written on many topics for various publications since the mid-1980s, but is best known for his coverage of the Orange County Theater.


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Olympic Theater Arts is hosting the Time Out concert this Friday https://theatreuaf.org/olympic-theater-arts-is-hosting-the-time-out-concert-this-friday/ Sat, 20 Nov 2021 09:30:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/olympic-theater-arts-is-hosting-the-time-out-concert-this-friday/ The Olympic Theater Arts Center hosts Time Out, a group of seasoned local musicians, for an evening of listening, dancing and socializing, starting at 7 p.m. on Friday, November 26 at Gathering Hall, 414 N. Sequim Ave. Time Out features songs from the Great American Songbook, Broadway shows, blues, and easy listening. Tickets cost $ […]]]>

The Olympic Theater Arts Center hosts Time Out, a group of seasoned local musicians, for an evening of listening, dancing and socializing, starting at 7 p.m. on Friday, November 26 at Gathering Hall, 414 N. Sequim Ave.

Time Out features songs from the Great American Songbook, Broadway shows, blues, and easy listening.

Tickets cost $ 10 and are available at the theater box office from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m., Tuesday to Friday, or online at OlympicTheatreArts.org.

For more information, call the theater at 360-683-7326.

Band members include: Ann Brittain, vocals; Ed Donahue, trumpet and bugle; Andy Geiger, tenor saxophone; Chuck Easton, guitar; Elaine Gardner-Morales, bass; and Pete Harris, drums.

Brittain, originally from Washington, recently moved from Seattle to Sequim. She has performed regularly in Seattle and said she was thrilled to be a part of the Olympic Peninsula scene.

“Music is my life!” Donahue said, and his resume echoes that sentiment. He recently retired as a music teacher and band director at Stevens Middle School in Port Angeles, where his bands regularly received accolades. He has also taught private lessons and was a clinician every year at the Blaine Jazz Festival in the summer. He is a member of the Stardust Big Band and is the group’s solo trumpeter.

Guitar, bass, keyboards, alto and tenor saxophones, trombone, tuba and acoustic harmonica… Easton plays them all. Every summer he is on the faculty of the famous Jazz Week at Centrum at Fort Worden in Port Townsend. He is also principal double bassist of the Port Townsend Symphony Orchestra. He conducts the Chuck Easton Quintet and other groups that play jazz, rhythm and blues, traditional jazz.

Gardner-Morales is the Director of Vocal Music at Peninsula College and in building the program introduced her students to excellent clinicians / artists. She moved to the Olympic Peninsula from Dallas, Texas, where she taught guitar, vocal jazz, composition, conducting, and music theory at Brookhaven College for the Arts. She plays bass for the Olympic Express Band, as well as for many small groups as a “first call” artist.

Geiger moved to the Port Angeles area in 2006 after retiring as director of intercollegiate sports at Ohio State University. Music has long been his favorite pastime, and he has been delighted to continue his “muse”, playing in the Stardust Big Band and the Peninsula College Jazz Ensemble, which he joined in 2008. He also plays in his trio and his quartet whenever there is an opportunity.

Harris also recently moved to the Sequim area with his partner, Brittain, from Seattle, where he led his own quartet, performed in Seattle’s loudest ukulele rock band and was a regular on the music scene of the city. He is also currently the drummer for Olympic Express.



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Theater Arts hosts Super Mega Molten Hot Lava New Play Festival – Sonoma State Star https://theatreuaf.org/theater-arts-hosts-super-mega-molten-hot-lava-new-play-festival-sonoma-state-star/ Wed, 17 Nov 2021 01:17:57 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/theater-arts-hosts-super-mega-molten-hot-lava-new-play-festival-sonoma-state-star/ From frozen planets and sci-fi thrillers to a creative approach to Native American land stewardship, the Super Mega Molten Hot Lava New Play Festival was filled with innovative work from students in the Playwriting I and Playwriting II classes at SSU. Students in these classes presented their work for the first time through Zoom Readings […]]]>

From frozen planets and sci-fi thrillers to a creative approach to Native American land stewardship, the Super Mega Molten Hot Lava New Play Festival was filled with innovative work from students in the Playwriting I and Playwriting II classes at SSU.

Students in these classes presented their work for the first time through Zoom Readings over the weekend to gauge the audience’s reaction to their work.

“Playwrights spend three months drafting ideas for plays, then writing them, then rewriting them… At some point, however, you have to read the play so that an audience understands what works… depending on what works. what we hear and learn at the festival the playwrights will continue to rewrite, ”Scott Horstein, director of the festival and theater studies program at SSU, wrote in an email.

According to the students who showed their work, everything from writing the play to producing it on Zoom was exciting.

“My writing process for my piece, Fire 101, has been touching. The traumatic blaze from the monument fires that passed through my family’s property haunted me at the start of the fall semester of 2021… I was able to personify all of my emotions into characters, who now act like a living room, ”Tiffani wrote Lopez in an email.

Asked about their favorite part of the process, third-year playwright and theater major JP Lloren said writing the story was the best part of the experience.

“Creating each character with a fairly straightforward but compelling personality was just a joy. I’m used to writing about established characters but not original characters. Having people in the roles that I create is weird, even. if I trust the cast to make it happen, ”Lloren wrote.

Character development was a remarkable part of the process for another Seawolf playwright.

“You want your ideas to make sense on paper… [My] the favorite part should just be thinking about how certain characters interact with each other in certain situations, ”playwright Sean Wilson wrote in an email.

Principal Drama Major, Playwright and Director John Ruzicka said, “It’s always exciting to hear your own work written and read aloud. “

In her third year majoring in Earth Sciences and performing at the festival, Stormi Martin wrote: “It’s a little intimidating once the scripts come out and you realize you’re playing a character that someone created for you. the very first time. ”

The collaboration was really important for the festival. The students worked together on everything from the writing process to the staging of each other’s plays.

“A lot of people in the class who wrote plays came forward as directors or actors for others, and it was really exciting to see the same people you knew in class now working on your play! Freshman and playwright Rylan Valdepena wrote in an email.

“We know that each of our plays is in good hands, whether we are playing for each other or directing for each other, each of us has done our part and only showed the most. great mutual support, ”Ruzicka wrote in an email.

According to Horstein, you can look for a number of student scripts that will come to life at another festival in the spring.

“Some will submit their pieces for ‘Power Lines’, our spring piece festival, where we take two or three short student pieces and make them live productions,” he explained.

For more information, visit the Department of Theater website.


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Drama arts department lets audience ‘Laugh with Durang’ – The Channels https://theatreuaf.org/drama-arts-department-lets-audience-laugh-with-durang-the-channels/ Mon, 15 Nov 2021 20:56:32 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/drama-arts-department-lets-audience-laugh-with-durang-the-channels/ The channel art pages | CRITICAL REVIEW The Theater Arts Department presented a series of plays by Christopher Durang titled “Laughing with Durang” at their preview party on Wednesday, November 10. The show is led by Assistant Instructor Matt Talbott and features Durang’s six unique pieces, including: “Medea,” “Funeral Home,” “The Doctor Will See You […]]]>

The channel art pages | CRITICAL REVIEW

The Theater Arts Department presented a series of plays by Christopher Durang titled “Laughing with Durang” at their preview party on Wednesday, November 10.

The show is led by Assistant Instructor Matt Talbott and features Durang’s six unique pieces, including: “Medea,” “Funeral Home,” “The Doctor Will See You Now,” “For Whom the Southern Beauty Is Ringing” and “ Wanda’s visit ”.

All the performances of the actors were excellent, as there were many scenes that made me feel like it was not a play but real situations. The way they portrayed their characters made it so realistic and added to the entertaining vibe of the show.

Several scenarios throughout the play were sometimes silly and too dramatic for my taste. Instead of judging the performance itself solely on these few scenes, I instead looked at how they added to the show as a whole.

A scene during “Medea” disturbed a viewer in front of me due to its involvement of political figures. However, many other members of the audience seemed to enjoy the scene as sweet laughter filled the room during it.

The show ends with “Wanda’s Visit,” featuring an unhappy and stranded couple after 13 years of marriage. Then the husband’s high school girlfriend comes to town to visit them and gives them a rude moment the whole time she is there. I wanted to kick the ex-girlfriend out of the house myself during the scene because she kept talking.

The background consisted of white hanging panels on which the spotlights displayed the various backgrounds. This helped create a neutral setting that was able to switch to different scenes with little change needed.

When I arrived, I looked up at the ceiling where I saw all the light beams and spotlights pointed at the stage. It was interesting to see how the stage crew created the backgrounds.

“Laughing with Durang” had a different setting than I was used to, which made the show more intimate and fun. Instead of a normal theatrical setup, audience members were seated diagonally facing each other.

The performers stood at eye level just in front of the audience. It helped the actors and actresses consistently engage with the crowd and grabbed my attention for the show.

“Laughing With Durang” will be performed until Saturday, November 20 at the Jurkowtiz Theater at City College.

Tickets cost $ 10 for students, $ 15 for seniors and City College employees, and $ 18 for general admission. They can be purchased on the theater website or by calling the ticket office at (805) 965-5935.


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Isolation and Beyond in Sartre’s “No Exit” by Stetson University Theater Arts https://theatreuaf.org/isolation-and-beyond-in-sartres-no-exit-by-stetson-university-theater-arts/ Fri, 12 Nov 2021 18:07:59 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/isolation-and-beyond-in-sartres-no-exit-by-stetson-university-theater-arts/ Inéz, Estelle and Joseph are forced to confront themselves in “No Exit”, which will take place from November 18 to 21 at Stetson’s Second Stage Theater at the Museum of Art – DeLand. From left to right: Hope Brown, Liza Tananbaum and Joseph Dallas (Stetson University / Reed Barkowitzno) Stetson University Theater Arts presents Jean-Paul […]]]>

Inéz, Estelle and Joseph are forced to confront themselves in “No Exit”, which will take place from November 18 to 21 at Stetson’s Second Stage Theater at the Museum of Art – DeLand. From left to right: Hope Brown, Liza Tananbaum and Joseph Dallas (Stetson University / Reed Barkowitzno)

Stetson University Theater Arts presents Jean-Paul Sartre’s play “No Exit,” a one-act philosophical drama that examines morality, identity and human relationships. Directed by Shay Figueroa, senior of Stetson Theater Arts, the production will take place November 18-21 at the Second Stage Theater in Stetson at the Museum of Art – DeLand.

The production features Joseph Garcin, Inéz Serrano and Estelle Rigault hanging out in a simple and mysterious play that depicts the afterlife. The trio get to know each other and learn why they are in a room together.

“The play touches on illusion and self-realization as the characters slowly drive themselves crazy,” said Figueroa, who is making her directorial debut. “It was interesting to break down the essence of the characters through their words and actions. I think audiences will be drawn in and think about how, in a much softer sense, he might relate to one or more of the characters in the production. “

“Stetson’s theater arts students are starting to get back into the mix after not having had the opportunity to participate in traditional theater for almost two years,” Figueroa added. “It was an honor and exciting to have this chance to work with my classmates in this collaborative production.”

To throw: Joseph Dallas (Joseph Garcin), Hope Brown (Inéz Serrano), Liza Tananbaum (Estelle Rigault) and Maya Evans (The Valet)

Or: Second Stage Theater at the Museum of Art – DeLand, 600 N. Woodland Blvd., DeLand, 32720 (adjacent to the DeLand campus)

When: Thursday-Saturday Nov. 18, 19 and 20 at 8 p.m. Sunday November 21 at 3 p.m.

Entrance and parking: To free

Tickets, reservations and more information: 386-822-8700


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UND’s Theater Arts Department Stages Oscar Wilde’s Crazy Comedy, “The Importance of Being Sincere” https://theatreuaf.org/unds-theater-arts-department-stages-oscar-wildes-crazy-comedy-the-importance-of-being-sincere/ https://theatreuaf.org/unds-theater-arts-department-stages-oscar-wildes-crazy-comedy-the-importance-of-being-sincere/#respond Thu, 11 Nov 2021 22:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/unds-theater-arts-department-stages-oscar-wildes-crazy-comedy-the-importance-of-being-sincere/ The play, directed by Kathleen McLennan, premiered Thursday, November 11. Performances continue at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday November 12 and 13, and from November 18 to 22. Masks are mandatory at the Burtness Theater. Tickets, $ 20 for general admission and $ 10 for students, are available online at https://burtness.und.edu/ or by calling […]]]>

The play, directed by Kathleen McLennan, premiered Thursday, November 11. Performances continue at 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday November 12 and 13, and from November 18 to 22. Masks are mandatory at the Burtness Theater.

Tickets, $ 20 for general admission and $ 10 for students, are available online at https://burtness.und.edu/ or by calling (701) 777-2587.

“The Importance of Being Consistent,” a world-class witty comedy, is Wilde’s most acclaimed comedy.

Brad Reissig, associate chair of the theater arts department, said he and his colleagues chose this play because after a year and a half of fighting COVID, they wanted to produce a play that “our audience, our students and our teachers might laugh. and with.”

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It also presents a valuable learning opportunity for theater arts students.

Kyle Mason (left) and Robert Cooper, play two singles who created alternate lives, using the name Ernest, to break away from their daily lives in Oscar Wilde's comedy, "The importance of being serious." Performances will take place November 11-13 and 18-20 at the Burtness Theater.  (Photo submitted)

Kyle Mason (left) and Robert Cooper, play two singles who created alternate lives, using the name Ernest, to break away from their daily lives in Oscar Wilde’s comedy, “The Importance of Being Steadfast” . Performances will take place November 11-13 and 18-20 at the Burtness Theater. (Photo submitted)

“It’s a beautifully written show that provides so many showcase opportunities for artists and designers to really show off their talents,” Reissig said. “And it’s a classic comedy that’s a different style than what our students have done before.

“We believe the audience will enjoy an evening of pure comedy and delight,” he said. “Something to enjoy for a few hours and leave the outside world behind. ”

The play centers on the story of two single people who create alternate lives, using Ernest’s name to break away from their daily existence. They attempt to win the hearts of two women who conveniently claim to love only men named Ernest.

Confusion and comedy ensue as the singles struggle to keep up with their ever-growing stories and become tangled up in a laughable mishap.

“The Importance of Being Consistent”, with its quick wit and quirky characters, continued to delight audiences for more than a century after its London premiere in 1895. Since then, it has been a mainstay on stages around the world. whole.

Emily Wirkus, as Lady Bracknell, and Robert Cooper, as Algernon, are caught in the confusion and comedy that ensue as two singles struggle to keep their stories straight in Oscar Wilde's comedy , "The importance of being serious," November 11-13 and 18-20 at the UND Burtness Theater.  (Photo submitted)

Emily Wirkus, as Lady Bracknell, and Robert Cooper, as Algernon, are caught in the confusion and comedy that ensue as two singles struggle to keep their stories straight in Oscar Wilde’s comedy , “The Importance of Being Steadfast”, staged November 11. 11-13 and 18-20 at the UND Burtness Theater. (Photo submitted)

Kyle Mason and Robert Cooper play two of the main roles, like John and Algernon, in the play. The other cast members are Emily Wirkus, Stevee Wittlieb, Erin Chaves, Piper Sommer, Tyler Hebert, Daniel Jung and Dylan Merritt.

The production team includes Camilla Morrison, costume, hair and makeup design; Brad Reissig, stage design and lighting; Otto Lieder, sound design; and Patrick Reading, technical director.

The production staff are Autumn Horton, stage manager, and Brigitte Froslee and Skylar Mack, assistant stage managers. Other members include Alex Rice, Ariel Long, Kyle Mason, Grace Rhoads, Amy Hahn, Tacy Crawford, Jessie Grabouski, Daniel Jung, Anne Mitchell, Anissa Oveson, Alyssa Donacki, Jenna Frelich, Gyu Ri Kim, Jenna Lester, Victoria Coleman, Jose Urrutia, Gavin Avery, Kaitlyn Heslep, Elizabeth Brendel, Gabriel Stokkan, Michael Toenies, Teagan Leusink, Andrew Ring, Kaitlin Rivers, Dakota Losee, and Joshua Clayton.

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The Department of Theater Arts presents The Living – The Lawrentian https://theatreuaf.org/the-department-of-theater-arts-presents-the-living-the-lawrentian/ https://theatreuaf.org/the-department-of-theater-arts-presents-the-living-the-lawrentian/#respond Fri, 05 Nov 2021 13:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/the-department-of-theater-arts-presents-the-living-the-lawrentian/ Last weekend, October 28-30, the Department of Theater Arts at Lawrence University performed the play The alive, written by Anthony Clarvoe and directed by drama teacher Timothy X. Troy. Co-responsible for production were senior Emilia Ciotti Hernandez and second year Isabel Osterhus. Set in London in 1665, the characters in the play are in the […]]]>

Last weekend, October 28-30, the Department of Theater Arts at Lawrence University performed the play The alive, written by Anthony Clarvoe and directed by drama teacher Timothy X. Troy. Co-responsible for production were senior Emilia Ciotti Hernandez and second year Isabel Osterhus.

Set in London in 1665, the characters in the play are in the midst of the Bubonic Plague, a deadly infection that has spread rapidly, killing millions of Europeans. According to the production brochure, The alive was written in 1993 during the HIV and AIDS crisis, but since the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020, the performance now has added meaning to its audience.

Centered around a group of characters affected by the bubonic plague in different ways, The alive offers a glimpse of a world before modern medicine. Ms Sarah Chandler, played by sophomore Hannah Amell, is unable to see her family after her husband dies of illness and her children are locked up with her sister’s family. Left with no one or nowhere to go, Sarah is forced to care for the sick and dying as a nurse.

Played by junior Alec Welhouse, Dr Edward Harman, one of the few doctors left in London during the plague, works with Sarah and cares for her patients. With many London residents dead or on the run in the countryside, feelings of isolation, loneliness and hopelessness develop with Sarah and Dr Harman’s relationship. These separation issues aside, the two characters also constantly risk their lives while caring for the sick, ultimately killing Dr. Harman with an intense case of the plague.

While Sarah and Dr Harman share the perspective of medical workers during the Bubonic Plague, aspects of government policy and intervention are also seen from the characters of Sir John Lawrence, played by sophomore Jon Wilker , and Lord Brounker, played by freshman Ella Rose Schaefer. Essentially left alone to rule the city of London with little money and resources, Sir John faces challenges in controlling the spread of the disease. Lord Brounker, who works with the King of England, frequently disagrees with Sir John, regardless of the character’s arguments.

While the audience is encapsulated by the struggles of commoners, as well as politicians, another character focuses on the plague death numbers. Played by junior Madeline Guest, Mr. John Graunt uses new statistical methodologies to predict how and where the plague will spread in and around London. Although frequently dismissed, Sir John employs Mr. Graunt to examine the plague-stricken numbers, giving the play’s plot a slight hope, as if the patterns and predictions Mr. Graunt calculated could save even the smallest part of London. of disease.

Each performer in the play gave an emotionally realistic performance of their character, tugging at the hearts of audience members who are themselves experiencing a pandemic. Acting, however, was not the production’s only fascinating experience. From the beautifully designed 1600s style costumes, with heavy fabrics, feathers, large skirts and other attention to detail, to intense and dramatic lighting, the performance of the department The alive dug deep into issues of social isolation, loss, politics and the general theme of survival.

As every element of the performance, from acting to dance and movement, the lighting, costumes and sound collided to create a realistic period piece with modern problem elements, nothing beats the final scene of the performance. After spending the entire room socially estranged from each other, Mr. Graunt reaches out to take Sarah’s hand, an act of hope and resilience during a time of desperation. Much, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic, can be learned from this production of The alive, but above all, the play asks the audience how they will take care of each other during such a dark time.


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The Nutcracker returns to the New Jersey Foundation for Dance and Theater Arts this month https://theatreuaf.org/the-nutcracker-returns-to-the-new-jersey-foundation-for-dance-and-theater-arts-this-month/ https://theatreuaf.org/the-nutcracker-returns-to-the-new-jersey-foundation-for-dance-and-theater-arts-this-month/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 10:30:46 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/the-nutcracker-returns-to-the-new-jersey-foundation-for-dance-and-theater-arts-this-month/ The New Jersey Foundation for the Dance and Dramatic Arts, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, has presented “The Nutcracker” in the North Jersey area for over two decades. This year, they will return to the stage and celebrate their annual performance. This exciting production is considered one of New Jersey’s finest theatrical performances. We are […]]]>

The New Jersey Foundation for the Dance and Dramatic Arts, a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit, has presented “The Nutcracker” in the North Jersey area for over two decades. This year, they will return to the stage and celebrate their annual performance.

This exciting production is considered one of New Jersey’s finest theatrical performances. We are presented with a musical theater presentation of the festive singers of the 1800s en route to the feast of Silberhause singing songs of seasonal joy and merriment, with delicious intertwining dances. Once inside the Silberhause house, the party guests enter and the party begins. Children play games and everyone loves dances. However: everything stops when Clara’s godfather, Drosselmeyer, arrives. Drosselmeyer – a creator of wonderful and magical things, brought gifts for all children. Life-size ballerina dolls and tapping soldier dolls delight party guests. Clara receives a beautiful Nutcracker, but jealous, Sabrina and Louisa steal it from her and break the lovely gift. Drosselmeyer then casts a spell on the broken Nutcracker, changing Clara’s world in ways she never could have imagined. Amazing acrobatic mice appear! They wreak havoc and fight with tin soldiers in iron combat with real swords! The Christmas tree reaches great heights. Grandpa’s clock comes to life, and just when all hope seems lost, Clara saves her Nutcracker from the Mouse Queen. The Nutcracker transforms into a Heroic Prince just as the snow begins to fall. The prince and Clara meet and travel together in his fantastic Candyland. They meet Mother Ginger and her clowns. The Dew Drop fairy with her candied roses dancing the glorious Waltz of Flowers. And finally, the Sugar Plum Fairy and her Rider perform a Grand Pas de Deux. Everyone joins in the farewell waltz as the court pays its final tribute to the little girl who saved the prince.

This year’s Sugar Plum Fairy is a former student of the American Youth Dance Company: Miss Livia Janjigian, now a professional dancer starting her dancing career. Mr. Alfonse Napolitano de Parsippany – graduate of Montclair State University, will play the roles of Cavalier and The Snow King. The role of Drosselmeyer will be played by veteran actor Robert L. Kerstner of Wurtsboro, New York. The role of Clara will be shared by Sydney Smith of Ramsey and Mackenzie Giampietro of Wyckoff. Fritz will be played by Kathryn Gruber of Ramsey and Mia Sabatelli of Ringwood. Vanessa Colaizzi and Emma Bushta of Franklin Lakes will share the role of Sabrina. And Louisa will be played by Isabella DiLorenzo of Kinnelon and Jeanna Carrazzone of Ringwood. The Prince will be played by Hailey Gruenler of West Milford and Soren Schwerner of Hewitt. Lead cast will include Frozen: Ringwood’s Ava-Grace Hahn. Dew Drop: Katie Muhleisen from Wyckoff and Alexandra Giakouminakis from Allendale. Marzipan leader: Alexandra Giakouminakis from Allendale and Katie Muhleisen from Wyckoff. Arabian conducts Ava-Grace Hahn of Ringwood and Alexandra Giakouminakis of Allendale. The Russian conducts Alyssa Dahdah from Wyckoff, Ava-Grace Hahn from Ringwood and Haley Lindstrom from West Milford. The Spanish Corps will be led by: Delaney Roark of Mahwah and Brynn Mahurter of Wanaque.

Get your holiday season off to a good start with “The Nutcracker!” by NJF. Performances will take place on Saturday November 20 and 21 at the Bergen County Academies at 200 Hackensack Avenue, Hackensack NJ. Show hours on Saturday (11/20) are 2:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. and show time on Sunday (11/21) is 2:00 p.m. All seats are reserved with ticketing as follows: $ 25 for orchestra seats and $ 20 for all other seats. This season, we will also be offering special group rates (over 10 participants) for all non-profit organizations (Girl Scout Troops, Non-Profit Senior Citizen Groups, Boys & Girls Clubs of America, etc.).

For more information on the group rate for nonprofits, please contact the NJF office by email at njftheatrearts@optonline.net or by phone at 973-839-3022. For all other ticket purchases, please visit www.etix.com. A limited number of tickets will be sold on site on the day of the performances.

For more information, please contact the New Jersey Foundation for Dance and Theater Arts at 973-839-3022 | www.njftheatrearts@optonline.net


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School of Theater and Dance Arts Allies on Broadway for Racial Justice • UNC Mirror https://theatreuaf.org/school-of-theater-and-dance-arts-allies-on-broadway-for-racial-justice-unc-mirror/ https://theatreuaf.org/school-of-theater-and-dance-arts-allies-on-broadway-for-racial-justice-unc-mirror/#respond Wed, 03 Nov 2021 10:00:00 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/school-of-theater-and-dance-arts-allies-on-broadway-for-racial-justice-unc-mirror/ Photo courtesy of Student Equity Advisory’s large Instagram page. During the summer of 2020, protesters flooded the streets outraged by the deaths of George Floyd and other black Americans. Voices across the country have erupted demanding an end to violence against minorities, as well as fairness for minority groups in traditionally white spaces. The University […]]]>
Photo courtesy of Student Equity Advisory’s large Instagram page.

During the summer of 2020, protesters flooded the streets outraged by the deaths of George Floyd and other black Americans. Voices across the country have erupted demanding an end to violence against minorities, as well as fairness for minority groups in traditionally white spaces.

The University of Northern Colorado School of Drama and Dance Arts has begun to respond to that call. While the school has taken steps such as introducing its Anti-Racism Action Plan and the ability to give voice to under-represented students through its Student Equity Advisory Council, the school has took another step towards equality this year by forming an alliance with Broadway for Racial Justice.

Rebecca Rich, Acting Associate Director and Assistant Professor of Drama at the School of Theater Arts and Dance, sought the alliance after hearing Broadway for Racial Justice Executive Director Brandon Nase speak at a virtual event called Broadway Advocacy Coalition in January. 2021. Although the school was awarded the Ally designation in April, according to Rich, it is difficult to know the effects of the alliance on students since the school has only resumed classes since late August.

Rich says she’s happy to have this ally in place to help students and faculty avoid

damaging interactions regarding race.

“I feel like BFRJ is a good sounding board in this regard to help me, help my students, help me help professors, and other of my peers and colleagues in terms of what happening in their rooms and how they can prevent future bad situations to the best of their ability and how to deal with the damage repair right now, ”said Rich.

The alliance gives students access to a greater number of resources in areas such as amplification, funding of shows and a hotline that can be used to report incidents of racism in workplaces and institutions. theatrical.

Micah Lawrence, an acting major junior, says organizations like this offer

support for people of color.

“It’s nice to know that there is an organization that is doing something for us…

For much of its existence, the theater was dominated by white males. From its early Greek performances that prohibited women from joining men on stage, to plays by white male playwrights like Henrik Ibsen, Tennessee Williams and Anton Tchekhov, and to guidance manuals for directors written by men like Francis Hodge, the White men have played a dominant role in the formation and history of the theater.

Lawrence says that while the alliance with Broadway for racial justice is a good implementation, marginalized students still struggle with a lack of representation in the theater program because almost all the teachers in the schools are white.

“I think it will be beneficial, but it’s hard to invoke change when the people who are trying to invoke change are nothing like us,” Lawrence said. “It’s a good step, but it’s still not enough.”

Rich shared that the school recognizes that changes are yet to be made.

“We know that there is still work to be done, and that this is not a race and that

collaboration takes time, ”said Rich.


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SBCC’s Theater Arts Department Plays LAUGH WITH DURANG This Month https://theatreuaf.org/sbccs-theater-arts-department-plays-laugh-with-durang-this-month/ https://theatreuaf.org/sbccs-theater-arts-department-plays-laugh-with-durang-this-month/#respond Tue, 02 Nov 2021 09:12:13 +0000 https://theatreuaf.org/sbccs-theater-arts-department-plays-laugh-with-durang-this-month/ SBCC Theater Arts Department Presents Student Performancese of Christopher Durang’s plays, affectionately called LAUGH WITH DURANG, November 10-20, 2021 at Jurkowitz Theater, directed by Matt Talbott. Our talented student cast will present a production of short pieces by acclaimed playwright Christopher Durang. His unique blend of humor and eccentricity will be on display in the […]]]>

SBCC Theater Arts Department Presents Student Performancese of Christopher Durang’s plays, affectionately called LAUGH WITH DURANG, November 10-20, 2021 at Jurkowitz Theater, directed by Matt Talbott.

Our talented student cast will present a production of short pieces by acclaimed playwright Christopher Durang. His unique blend of humor and eccentricity will be on display in the intimate Jurkowitz Theater.

The pieces presented are: Medea, Funeral Parlor, For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls, The Doctor Will See You Now and Wanda’s Visit.

In Wanda’s visit, Jim and Marsha have been married for thirteen years and feel a bit bored and unhappy. Wanda, Jim’s former girlfriend, shows up for a visit and becomes a guest from hell. Out for dinner one night, all hell breaks loose in the restaurant as a waiter tries to cope with his first day with the confused trio.

Medea is a sketch co-written by Durang and Wendy Wasserstein. Medea and her choir of 3 women try to determine whether it is appropriate to kill your children to punish your husband. Jason introduces himself; the same is true of a messenger with news of Lady Teazle; and a Deus ex Machina descends from the sky to lift everyone’s spirits.

In Funeral Parlor, a widow is accosted at her husband’s funeral by a very inappropriate guest.

For Whom the Southern Belle Tolls is a parody of The Glass Menagerie, in which Amanda, the Southern Belle in decline, tries to prepare her hypersensitive and hypochondriac son, Lawrence, for “the female caller”. Terrified of people, Lawrence plays with his collection of glass cocktail stirrers. Ginny, the female caller, is hard of hearing and bossy kind. Brother Tom wants to go to the cinema, where he meets sailors who must be lodged in his room. Amanda tries to face everything with “charm and liveliness”, but sometimes she just wants to hit someone.

In The Doctor Will See You Now, a rowdy singer, dressed in sequins and a boa, continues to burst into loud songs in a doctor’s office. Mr Wilson is there to see the doctor about an allergy, but the doctor and his nurse insist he has venereal disease and call everyone he knows.

LAUGH WITH DURANG will feature: Riley Barker, Sydney Bascom, Aurore Bernard, Lexie Brent, Kristina Clark, Liz Gates, Mario Guerrero, James Hanasz, Isaac Hernandez, Abbie Mintz, Stevie O’Donnell, Amanda Russell, Jackie Shearn, Sue Smiley , George Sullivan, Lizzy Urwick and Tyler Witucki.

Performances will take place November 10-20, 2021 at the Jurkowitz Theater on the SBCC West Campus, 900 Block Cliff Dr. Wednesday through Saturday at 7:30 p.m., Sunday 11/14 and Saturday 11/20 at 2 p.m. Previews November 10 and 11 at 7:30 p.m. The performance on Sunday November 14 at 2 p.m. will be captioned live for the hearing impaired. Tickets are $ 18 typically / $ 15 for seniors and CCSC staff / $ 10 for students, and can be purchased online at www.theatregroupsbcc.com or by calling the box office at 805-965-5935.


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